You’ve probably heard about the ketogenic diet by now. Everyone seems to be talking about it and emerging research supports the idea that the diet has multiple benefits, mainly long-term weight loss.

Beyond its popularity, have you ever wondered if the ketogenic diet right for everyone?

In this article, let’s take a look at what research has to say if anyone can simply jump on the ketogenic diet to reap its health benefits.

Keto Diet at a Glance

Although the ketogenic diet is more popular than ever now, its origins go back to 1923, when it was used at the Mayo Clinic to treat epilepsy. The official breakdown of macronutrients if you’re on a ketogenic diet generally falls in the realm of the following:

  • 60-75 percent fat – recommended fats include monounsaturated fats such as avocados, walnut, olive, and flaxseed, olives, and nut products.
  • 15-30 percent protein – eggs (embrace the yolk!), free-range poultry, beef and pork, seafood with particular emphasis on oily fish like mackerel, salmon, and sardines.
  • 5-10 percent carbohydrates – vegetables and fruits that are low in carbs such as those are that grown above the ground and are rich in fiber.

When you’re on a ketogenic diet, your body will go into ketosis (a glycogen-deprived state resulting from the low-carb intake). Instead of using glucose as your primary source of energy, your body uses fat to produce energy which in turn leads to the production of ketones.

Unlike glucose which provides you with sudden bursts of energy (hello sugar crash after a high-carb meal!), the energy from fat burns slower. When you’re not moving enough to use the energy produced from oxidizing glucose, your body stores them as unwanted fat. Meanwhile, when your body isn’t consuming carbs, it begins to use its fat stores as fuel, which in turns leads to weight loss.

Who Can Benefit from the Ketogenic Diet?

Recent research suggests that a ketogenic diet is beneficial for people with the following health issues and conditions:

 

Who Should Not Follow the Ketogenic Diet?

While one research after the other seems to be in favor of the high-fat and low-carb nature of the ketogenic diet, it’s not recommended for the following individuals:

  • Women who are trying to conceive
  • Individuals with issues in metabolizing fat and similar disorders
  • Growing children
  • Type 1 diabetics because of the likelihood of diabetic ketoacidosis (not to be confused with ketosis)
  • It’s also worth noting that Individuals with blood lipid profile issues may need to check with their general physicians first and/or closely monitor their lipid profile levels while on the diet

Your Next Step

Find out if the ketogenic diet is right for you by scheduling an appointment with Hauser Health if you’re in Frederick and surrounding areas in Maryland. We’ll work with you in finding the right diet for your current nutritional needs and lifestyle.